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The role of cultural competence and diversity in american healthcare

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Published online May 1. Accepted Feb 4. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Increasing Diversity in the U.S.: The Importance of Cultural Competence in Healthcare

Abstract International migration is a global phenomenon challenging healthcare professionals to provide culturally competent care. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of leaders on the cultural competence of healthcare professionals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted from to to obtain data for a social network analysis in 19 inpatient services and five primary care services in Belgium.

  • Highest in-degree centrality was used to identify the leaders within each health service;
  • Monitor racial and ethnic disparities using data, and institute quality improvement initiatives where needed;
  • What are the ideal roles, responsibilities, and prerogatives of patients, families and providers?
  • The multicultural makeup of the U.

The Competences in Ethnicity and Health questionnaire was used. A total of healthcare professionals, including nurses, identified their social relationships with other healthcare professionals working in their service. Highest in-degree centrality was used to identify the leaders within each health service. Multiple regressions with the Huber sandwich estimator were used to link cultural competence of leaders with the cultural competence of the rest of the healthcare staff.

Results Cultural competence of the healthcare staff was associated with the cultural competence of the leaders. This association remained significant for two specific domains of cultural competence—mediation and paradigm—after controlling for contextual and sociodemographic variables. Interaction analysis suggested that the leadership effect varied with the degree of cultural competence of the leaders.

  1. What behaviors demonstrate respect for persons, patients, and families?
  2. The quality of care, including patient safety, depends on the efforts of the entire team and not just on a few individuals Taylor et al. What are the ideal roles, responsibilities, and prerogatives of patients, families and providers?
  3. Like says that the incidents at these hospitals could have benefited from an exploration and negotiation of each of these three possibilities among all of those involved — patients, practitioners, and staff.
  4. Poor communication between healthcare workers and patients can lead to greater health disparities and lower levels of satisfaction with healthcare.

Discussion Cultural competence among healthcare professionals is acquired partly through leadership. Social relationships and leadership effects within health services should be considered when developing and implementing culturally competent strategies.

The Importance of Cultural Diversity in Health Care

This requires a cautious approach as the most central individuals are not always the same persons as the formal leaders. Belgium, health equity, immigration, leadership, social network, transcultural nursing International migration is a global and complex phenomenon. Many European countries, including Belgium, are experiencing increasing population diversity arising from international immigration.

Leadership and Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals

Labor migrants, past colonial links, and, for some countries, their strategic position in the European Union are factors contributing to this diversity. Although the organization of health services and health systems varies from one country to another, migrants and ethnic minorities are more at risk of experiencing poor health outcomes when compared to the rest of the population.

Background

Higher prevalence of mental health troubles, such as psychosis and anxiety syndromes, and a poorest perception of subjective health were found among Turks and Moroccans living in Belgium when compared to Belgians Fossion et al. Moreover, migrants and ethnic minorities have lower levels of access to health promotion facilities and health prevention Ochieng, ; Wilson et al. Among other examples, culturally competent interventions may include the development of culturally specific health services or ethnically sensitive health promotion campaigns, the deployment of interpreters and intercultural mediators in health facilities, as well as migrant-friendly health policies Beach et al.

Training models for cultural competence focus on developing the nontechnical skills of health professionals, such as empathy, openness, or kindness toward ethnic minorities Seeleman et al. In most training programs in cultural competence, the focus is on the individual healthcare professional rather than on groups. More precisely, although these interventions are likely to increase short-term patient outcomes of satisfaction, their effects are not sustained on the long term.

  • A total of healthcare professionals, including nurses, identified their social relationships with other healthcare professionals working in their service;
  • An International Effort Cultural competency efforts are underway not only in the US, but in Europe, Australia, and other parts of the world;
  • Healthcare workers must be informed about the cultural factors that influence people's health beliefs and behaviors, and they must be provided with the tools they need to serve a multi-cultural patient community;
  • Let's look at the benefits of cultural competence and how healthcare workers can employ culturally sensitive practices;
  • In addition, the number of male nurses has increased;
  • Monitor racial and ethnic disparities using data, and institute quality improvement initiatives where needed.

There may be insufficient evidence of a beneficial effect of cultural competence training on patient adherence and health outcomes as these programs mainly focus on one-time training and do not pay enough more attention to interdisciplinary interactions Beach et al.

Delivering healthcare is a multidisciplinary and collective activity, especially in hospitals and primary care services. The quality of care, including patient safety, depends on the efforts of the entire team and not just on a few individuals Taylor et al.

Improvement Stories

The relevant education paradigms focus on lapses and report behaviors that the healthcare professional should avoid. Moreover, being culturally competent is not, on its own, adequate.

Improvement Stories

Each healthcare professional uses their own specific expertise to care for patients, and the combination of their complementary competences has positive effects on patient health outcomes Cameron et al. These norms usually spread among healthcare professionals via the most influential individuals: Normative influence is exerted through social side payments: In such a context, healthcare professionals with specific expertise in cultural competence will be more likely to integrate this competence into their daily practice.

Negative norms, on the other hand, include a negative perception of intercultural care or poor appreciation of cultural competence. The risk of poor appreciation of cultural competence is even greater when the skills are nontechnical skills that are difficult to grasp.

For these three reasons social learning, externalities, and normsit is likely that cultural competence is spread through leadership. In this study, influence of leaders on the cultural competence of the rest of the healthcare staff was investigated through a social network analysis.