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The roles and lives of women in the military

Women overcome barriers for greater role in military

Robinson is the first woman to lead a top-tier U. Yet a recent story from the current presidential contest serves as a reminder that not long ago, women faced opposition not just to being in combat, but to being in uniform at all. Regardless, so much has changed since Pence wrote that piece. Since 1999, military women have been defying cultural norms and changing perceptions about their capabilities through their actions and their deeds.

  1. This week, All Things Considered examines the expanding role of women in the military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. These women are warriors in every sense of the word, and their physical and mental capabilities clearly demonstrate that military women are capable of competing with men when they are trained and challenged by good leaders with high standards and high expectations for their performance.
  2. In revamping how the military trains soldiers to address underlying assumptions of male soldiers, leaders could look to how women soldiers were viewed overseas as a potential point to emphasize. Both officers graduated at the top of their class of 137 students, and both cited having leaders who supported their early aspirations to become artillery officers as the key to their success.
  3. In practice, however, Dutch women are assigned to traditional roles, such as clerical, communication and nursing work. And then there are the women graduating from training courses and schools once considered too difficult for them.

And they are letting their service speak for itself in even greater numbers, with more than 200,000 women serving on active duty. Indeed, in 1999, the idea that women would ever be fully capable of competing with men for ground combat jobs would have been considered nothing short of ridiculous.

Roles for Women in U.S. Army Expand

Back then, it would have been unthinkable that women would be in charge of the academics and the leadership of the Army cadets at West Point. Yet in 2016, Brig. Diana Holland and Cindy Jebb assumed these very posts, proving that women have the leadership and intellectual prowess required for the most challenging positions in the military. Two decades ago, it would also have been considered crazy to suggest a woman could ever competently serve as a combatant commander. Yet in May 2016, Air Force Gen.

Lori Robinson took charge as the leader of U. According to the secretary of defense, Robinson was selected for the position because she was the most competitive for the job out of all of the general officers considered, regardless of gender.

And then there are the women graduating from training courses and schools once considered too difficult for them. There are the three female Rangers who graduated from the toughest leadership school in the Army. Not only did the women who earned the Ranger tab fully compete with their male counterparts throughout the course, but their actions and willingness to help their male counterparts during the most physically arduous training events also earned the respect of their peers.

These women are warriors in every sense of the word, and their physical and mental capabilities clearly demonstrate that military women are capable of competing with men when they are trained and challenged by good leaders with high standards and high expectations for their performance. Both officers graduated at the top of their class of 137 students, and both cited having leaders who supported their early aspirations to become artillery officers as the key to their success.

Unfortunately, once they leave the service, many female veterans report that their service is not valued or respected by the public. If they show their identification cards or wear clothing with military logos, the roles and lives of women in the military assume that they are simply spouses or girlfriends of servicemen. These women are indeed wives, daughters, mothers and sisters.

  1. In practice, however, Dutch women are assigned to traditional roles, such as clerical, communication and nursing work.
  2. Based on 28 focus groups, they interviewed 198 soldiers and conducted surveys with 1,701 men and 214 women all involved in jobs with the U. Not only did the women who earned the Ranger tab fully compete with their male counterparts throughout the course, but their actions and willingness to help their male counterparts during the most physically arduous training events also earned the respect of their peers.
  3. Through deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan, many female participants in the study mentioned their experiences of accessing women in the Middle East and how indigenous people there often see them as Americans and soldiers first instead of a woman first.
  4. Based on 28 focus groups, they interviewed 198 soldiers and conducted surveys with 1,701 men and 214 women all involved in jobs with the U.

But they are also military leaders, warriors, academics and mentors in their own right. As the military has evolved to develop an appreciation for the potential of women to serve in the most challenging of positions, it is also time for the American public to see these women for what they bring to the fight: They are not victims and they are not to be sheltered from the grim realities of war because of the myth of female frailty.