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The strong will survive in lord of the flies a novel by william golding

I've just finished rereading this book for my book club but, to be honest, I've liked it ever since my class were made to read it in high school.

Overall, Lord of the Flies doesn't seem to be very popular, but I've always liked the almost Hobbesian look at the state of nature and how humanity behaves when left alone without societal rules and structures. Make the characters all angel-faced kids with sadistic sides to their personality and what do you have? Just your Kids are evil.

Lord of the Flies

Just your average high school drama, but set on a desert island. With a bit more bloody murder. But not that much more.

  1. Who would be Jack and who would be Ralph?
  2. Just what the people thought after all the cruel things that happened in the war. Throughout the story, Ralph always mentions his dad, who is a commander in the British Navy.
  3. He likes being cruel to others and therefore gladly helps Jack.

In 1954, when this book was published, Britain was in the process of being forced to face some harsh realities that it had blissfully chosen to ignore beforehand - that it is not, in fact, the centre of the universe, and the British Empire was not a thing of national pride, but an embarrassing infringement on the freedom and rights of other human beings.

Much of British colonialism had been justified as a self-righteous mission to educate and modernise foreign "savages".

  • You could choose to view the charismatic and manipulative Jack Merridew as a kind of Hitler or other dictator who takes advantage of a group of people at their weakest;
  • The beast causes great fear and that fear brings the littluns and most of the biguns in the arms of Jack, who says he is a hunter and that he will protect everybody;
  • Lord of the Flies;
  • The huge negativity of course;
  • What would you do in a situation like that?

So when put into its historical context, alongside the decolonisation movements, this book could be said to be an interesting deconstruction of white, Western supremacy. This is not a tale of "savages" who were raised in poor, rural villages. I can understand why some people interpret this book as racist.

And Piggy even asks "Which is better - to be a pack of painted niggers like you are or to be sensible like Ralph is?

For me, I always saw it as Golding challenging the notion of savages being dark-skinned, uneducated people from rural areas. With this book, he says screw that, I'll show you savages! I think that seemed especially clear from the ending when the officer says "I should have thought that a pack of British boys - you're all British, aren't you? Some readers say that you have to have quite a negative view of human nature already to appreciate this book, but I don't think that's true.

Lord of the Flies

I'm not sure I necessarily agree with all the implications running around in the novel - namely, the failure of democracy and the pro-authority stance - but it serves as an interesting look at the dark side of human nature and how no one is beyond its reach. Plus, anyone who had a bit of a rough time in high school will probably not find the events in this book a huge leap of the imagination.

The fascinating thing about Lord of the Flies is the way many historical parallels can be drawn from the messages it carries. You could choose to view the charismatic and manipulative Jack Merridew as a kind of Hitler or other dictator who takes advantage of a group of people at their weakest. Dictators and radicals often find it easy to slip in when a society is in chaos. Still a fascinating book after all these years.

  1. He stands for Evil. It is again about the hunting.
  2. He stands for intelligence in the story.
  3. When I listen at school to my classmates, everybody would be glad to help and a lot of people want to become doctors.
  4. And not being the most clever one. So the boys start out with a democracy but they end with a tyranny.