Homeworks academic service


The theme of french revolution in the novel les misrables by victor hugo

I became a passionate fan of the stage musical back when it opened on Broadway in 1987, when I still had good intentions of going into show business, while already being well on the way to the history nerd and French Revolution geek that I am today. I could have played Cosette, but that role was already cast.

  • Backstory in the novel;
  • During the next year and a half, under the influence of some radical politicians, various laws are enacted or proposed, which attempt to spread the wealth around a little and improve the lives of the working poor;
  • There is nothing else that matters;
  • After three years of royal incompetence; royal waffling; political squabbling between progressives and hardline royalist conservatives; and discontent among the poor at how the Revolution turned out to be a lot more about Liberty than Equality, the French Revolution reaches a more radical phase.

So eventually I became a writer instead, and made a career, of sorts, of my French Revolutionary geekdom, and quietly waited and yearned for someone, anyone, to make a grand, epic, over-the-top film of that grand, epic, over-the-top stage musical. Hugo, of course, was writing his historical novel for a French audience in the 1860s, who knew their recent history and who would have recognized nearly everything and everyone he mentioned.

Over the next year or two the king—Louis XVI, well-meaning but something of a bumbler and a waffler—reluctantly accepts the reforms that are put into place and agrees to reign as a constitutional monarch. After three years of royal incompetence; royal waffling; political squabbling between progressives and hardline royalist conservatives; and discontent among the poor at how the Revolution turned out to be a lot more about Liberty than Equality, the French Revolution reaches a more radical phase.

The conservative constitutional monarchy is overthrown in a violent uprising and Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette are imprisoned. The monarchy is officially abolished and France is declared a republic; the democratically elected National Convention becomes the ruling body. During the next year and a half, under the influence of some radical politicians, various laws are enacted or proposed, which attempt to spread the wealth around a little and improve the lives of the working poor.

The Terror begins, in response to pressures within and without of foreign war and civil war. The Committee of Public Safety begins to fracture as its members divide along ideological lines and quarrel violently. Robespierre and his closest adherents are overthrown, and quickly guillotined, in what is essentially a palace coup. At this point a lot of the progressive laws enacted or proposed in 1793 and 94 by the revolutionary radicals, intended to ease poverty and help the working classes, have already been, or will soon be, repealed by the cynical, greedy, mostly corrupt new ruling class.

Hugo was clearly pointing out that, despite this episode taking place right after the Revolution, the poor were just as wretched as they had ever been—and the laws were just as brutal.

The Directory runs things while a fair number of smart, unscrupulous opportunists get very, very rich, and the poor remain very, very poor. In the end, nothing much has changed in ten years of shakeup, except that the ruling class is now made up of wealthy bourgeois profiteers and financiers instead of the blue-blooded hereditary nobility of the prerevolutionary regime. Napoleon, still successfully governing France and taking over chunks of Europe, is declared Emperor of the French.

Napoleon tries occupying Moscow, is defeated by the Russian winter, and slinks back to France with his tail between his legs.

What are the themes in Les Miserables by Victor Hugo?

What happened to No. Jean Valjean is released from prison and eventually tears up his parolee papers, disappears, and begins a new life under a new name. Napoleon makes his last bid for power but is finally defeated at the Battle of Waterloo June 18. Louis XVIII returns to Paris and the royal line is officially restored for good, although as a limited constitutional monarchy.

  1. Hugo was clearly pointing out that, despite this episode taking place right after the Revolution, the poor were just as wretched as they had ever been—and the laws were just as brutal. In the end, nothing much has changed in ten years of shakeup, except that the ruling class is now made up of wealthy bourgeois profiteers and financiers instead of the blue-blooded hereditary nobility of the prerevolutionary regime.
  2. It deteriorated badly over the next three decades, eventually becoming a decrepit, crumbling, rat-infested eyesore. The Terror begins, in response to pressures within and without of foreign war and civil war.
  3. When Jean Valjean is arrested for stealing bread to feed the children, he is given four years in prison.
  4. Human rights - In the beginning of the novel, Jean Valjean and his sister's family are starving and struggling to live. Jean Maximilien Lamarque, popular liberal politician and former Napoleonic general, dies during a cholera epidemic in Paris.
  5. Cross post from her blog. The Directory runs things while a fair number of smart, unscrupulous opportunists get very, very rich, and the poor remain very, very poor.

Backstory in the novel: Marius, born a couple of years earlier, is brought up by his staunchly royalist grandpapa. Cosette is born sometime around this date. Napoleon dies in exile on the remote island of St. Valjean, now a successful small-town businessman, tries to save Fantine, runs afoul of Javert, rescues little Cosette from the Thenardiers, and escapes to Paris. He has no son, so the crown goes to his younger brother, Charles X.

Unfortunately, Charles X is a clueless, rigid reactionary with kitty litter for brains, who thinks that going back to the prerevolutionary absolute monarchy would be a perfectly swell idea.

Radicals dream about a second republic while Bonapartists dream of restoring the Empire.

  • Injustice, but also one of class;
  • Louis XVIII returns to Paris and the royal line is officially restored for good, although as a limited constitutional monarchy;
  • Jean Maximilien Lamarque, popular liberal politician and former Napoleonic general, dies during a cholera epidemic in Paris;
  • Instead, Javert pursues him relentlessly, allowing Valjean no redemption;
  • I could have played Cosette, but that role was already cast;
  • Hugo was clearly pointing out that, despite this episode taking place right after the Revolution, the poor were just as wretched as they had ever been—and the laws were just as brutal.

Jean Maximilien Lamarque, popular liberal politician and former Napoleonic general, dies during a cholera epidemic in Paris. His state funeral sets off rioting and armed resistance among disaffected students and workers, who are hoping to repeat the success of the July Revolution and overthrow Louis-Philippe, or at least to have the clout to demand additional social and legal reforms in the established system.

  1. His human rights are violated as are those of Fantine who is abandoned by the man she loves. The Terror begins, in response to pressures within and without of foreign war and civil war.
  2. The conservative constitutional monarchy is overthrown in a violent uprising and Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette are imprisoned.
  3. It is this unjust system that causes Javert's suicide as he realizes that he has pursued the man who has saved his life.
  4. The Terror begins, in response to pressures within and without of foreign war and civil war.

After 18 years of Louis-Philippe, the Parisians kick him out, too, in the Revolution of 1848—which is kinda-sorta foreshadowed with that ginormous barricade full of singing ghosts in the grand finale of the film—and proclaim the Second Republic. The Second Empire lasts for almost 20 years, 1851-70, before collapsing after the disastrous Franco-Prussian War. A new republic is proclaimed. The government troops eventually suppress the rebellion in May 1871 by shooting down about 20,000 people in one week, ten times as many as were guillotined in Paris during the 16-month Terror of 80 years before; and the Third Republic comes into being—which chugs creakily along until Hitler invades France in 1940.

Well, chalk one up to faithfulness to the literary and historical source. The elephant actually existed. Though the final elephant was intended to be a gigantic bronze statue, only a full-size plaster and wood mockup was built before Napoleon went into exile.

No, It’s Not Actually the French Revolution: Les Misérables and History by Susanne Alleyn

It deteriorated badly over the next three decades, eventually becoming a decrepit, crumbling, rat-infested eyesore. Susanne AlleynJanuary 7, 2013. Cross post from her blog. She is also the author of Medieval Underpants and Other Blunders: