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The writing styles of a slave frederick douglass

Certified Educator It is important, too, to acknowledge the structure of the narrative. It begins with a preface, written by William Lloyd Garrison, a well-known Massachusetts abolitionist, publisher of The Liberator, an anti-slavery newspaper, and a friend and associate of Douglass.

The writing styles of a slave frederick douglass

In this preface, Garrison certifies that "Mr. Douglass has very properly chosen to write his own Narrative, in his own style, and according to the best of his ability, rather than to employ someone else. It is important, too, to acknowledge the structure of the narrative. This preface is followed by a letter to Douglass from Wendell Phillips, Esq.

While Garrison's words validate Douglass's ability to tell his own story, Phillips's letter validates Douglass's ability to narrate history. His voice, Phillips asserts, would be instrumental in wrenching narrative authority from the masters.

  1. Aside from his description of his age, the sentences that he uses to describe himself and his lineage are simple and declarative. However, prior to this, Douglass does his best to carry the reader through his life.
  2. He is also very detailed regarding the privations of slaves, including the fact that children who did not work in the fields went "almost naked.
  3. It is important, too, to acknowledge the structure of the narrative.
  4. In this preface, Garrison certifies that "Mr.

In telling his own story, Douglass employs a style that was also employed in other slave narratives. He begins by centralizing and personalizing his voice: This is especially important because Douglass, like many slaves, did not know his age, but can only estimate that he is between "twenty-seven and twenty-eight years of age" at the time that he writes this narrative.

What style of writing did Frederick Douglass use in his autobiography?

Aside from his description of his age, the sentences that he uses to describe himself and his lineage are simple and declarative. He knows his mother's name and those of his grandparents.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

He also knows that his father was a white man. Douglass is very precise about details, such as the names of his relatives and members of the family that owned him. He is also very detailed regarding the privations of slaves, including the fact that children who did not work in the fields went "almost naked. He is also very linear in telling his story. It is not until chapter 9 that he notes "I have now reached a period of my life when I can give dates. However, prior to this, Douglass does his best to carry the reader through his life.

Chapter headings begin with pivotal moments and sections of time: Nearly every chapter begins with a date or a span of time.